Oil, Types of Oil, Shivesh, Kitchen, Cooking, Recipe, Food, Production, Tasty, Beef, Chicken, Beef, Pork, Fish

 

Groundnut Oil/ Peanut Oil

This is one of the most commonly consumed oils in India, particularly in the rural areas.
It contains heart-friendly MUFA that lowers the level of bad cholesterol in our body without lowering the levels of good cholesterol. In the market, it is available in refined form as well as filtered form, although the filtered oils are nutritionally superior; they often contain toxic compounds or other adulterants. This oil is suitable for all types of cooking, frying, grilling seasoning, etc.

Olive Oil

Olive oil is good for salad dressing, although more expensive than other oils; olive oil has many health benefits. Studies have found that consumption of
olive oil can lower the risk of coronary heart diseases. When buying olive oil, it is best to select the extra virgin variety in order to get maximum benefits. Olive oil should be used to prepare salad dressings, as a seasoning for soups, or for sautéing vegetables, it is generally not advisable to use this oil for frying and heating since it has a low smoke point. It is not suited for Indian frying conditions because Indians mostly use oils for frying and not as dressing.

Rice Bran Oil (RBO)

It is relatively new oil that is extracted from rice-bran, the most nutritious part of rice. Rice bran oil is gaining popularity across the world; it is unique edible oil with many nutritional benefits, as compared to other edible oils. It has magical cholesterol-lowering properties due to the presence of a component called Oryzanol; it also contains squalene, which is good for the skin. It is probably the only oil that reduces bad cholesterol, at the same time increasing the much required good cholesterol. It is the ideal cooking oil since it has good stability (it does not decompose at high temperatures to form toxic compounds) and is suitable for deep-frying. Studies have shown that snacks prepared in rice bran oil absorb 12-25 percent less oil than those prepared in groundnut oil. It is the best oil for deep-frying and everyday cooking.

Mustard Oil

This oil is traditionally used in West Bengal, Uttar Pradesh & other Northern part of India and is prized for its characteristic flavour (pungent and sharp). Mustard oil has a higher proportion of MUFA and is also a rich source of the PUFA. However, it also contains erucic acid, a fatty acid that has undesirable effects on health when consumed in large amounts. Mustard oil should be used along with other cooking oils to reduce the erucic, acid content. Mustard oil is sometimes adulterated with argemone oil, which is toxic.
 

Sunflower Oil

It is popular cooking oil available under many brand names. Extracted from the seeds of the sunflower, this is a good all purpose oil. This oil is rich in PUFA, particularly linoleic acid that lowers the levels of both good and bad cholesterol. Hence, this oil cannot be used as the only cooking oil.

Safflower Oil (Kordi)

This is light all- purpose oil extracted from the seeds of the safflower. It has a more oily texture and a nuttier flavour than sunflower oil. It is suitable for deep-frying. It also contains PUFA in the form of linoleic acid. Like sunflower oil, this oil too should be used in combination with other oils.

Soya Bean Oil

Extracted from soybeans, soybeans oil contains PUFA, particularly linoleic acid and alpha-linoleic acid (ALA) in the right balance, which are essential for human health. This oil is suitable for all types of cooking methods except frying. PUFA gets oxidized at frying temperatures to form toxic compounds. It is not recommended for salad dressings because of its slightly fishy flavour.

Palm Oil

Bright orange waxy oil, it is used in the manufacture of vegetable oils and fats. It has a nutty flavour and is high in saturated fats. It contains MUFA and is low in linoleic acid, hence it is healthy to use in combination with other oils.

Coconut Oil

Solid at room temperature, coconut oil is white and buttery in texture; it has a distinctive coconut flavour and is widely used in south India, it is high in saturated fats. However it contains saturated fats that are different from those present in animal fats. It can be safely consumed as part of a balanced diet, in combination with other cooking oils. It contains lauric acid, a medium-chain fatty acid that has germ-fighting, antiviral and antifungal properties, according to the National Centre for Biotechnology Information. Coconut oil will not only help rid your body of bacteria and viruses, it is also rich in monounsaturated fat, which helps to reduce cholesterol and triglyceride levels. The “Ceylon Medical Journal” notes that coconut fats do not contain artery-clogging trans fatty acid, making coconut oil a healthy choice for those with heart problems. Unrefined coconut oil smells and tastes like raw coconuts and adds tropical flavour to foods.

Flaxseed Oil

Flaxseed oil has a nutty flavour and is rich in nutrients. You can add it to uncooked dishes or take it as a supplement. It is high in omega-3 fatty acids, which enhance brain function and lower your risk of developing heart disease. Consuming flaxseed oil can also improve your joint mobility, reduce your risk of a heart attack or stroke and enhance the function of your immune system. If you plan to take flaxseed oil as a supplement, consult your doctor, who can recommend the right dose for you based on your specific health needs. Flaxseed oil is available at most health food stores in liquid and capsule forms.

Butter

It is made from milk fat and contains a high proportion of saturated fats and increases cholesterol when consumed, both of which are risk factors for developing heart disease. Hence, it is wise to consume less amount of butter.

Ghee

Prepared from milk fat, ghee or clarified butter is an essential item in Indian cuisine. According to Indian medical systems, ghee contains several medicinal properties. Nutritionally, like butter, it also contains saturated fats and cholesterol which, when consumed in excess, leads to heart diseases. Using small amount of ghee to season foods is not harmful. Just avoid sweets and other dishes Prepared with large quantities of ghee.

Vanaspati

It is nothing but a mixture of vegetable oils that have been converted to solid form by the addition of Hydrogen. Hydrogenated fat is used as a ghee substitute in cooking as well in the production of bakery products, sweets and snack items. When vanaspati is made, trans fatty acids are also produced; these increase the risk of heart disease when consumed in excess and are best avoided. 

Walnut Oil

Walnut oil is extracted from English walnut that are dried and then cold-pressed; it has polyunsaturated fat and is good source of omega 3s. With a smoke point of 400 degrees F, this oil is good for baking and sautéing at low to medium-high heat or try it drizzled on a salad. Walnut oil has a limited shelf life, about 6-12 months. Once opened, all nut oils should be kept in a cool place out of the light or refrigerated to prevent them from becoming rancid. Several medical studies have conducted research that indicates that walnut oil offers a rich source for antioxidants, specifically ellagic acid. This antioxidant has been found to detoxify several substances linked to the development of certain cancers. In addition, ellagic acid also helps to obstruct these cancer cells from replicating themselves. Walnut oil is also rich in manganese and copper, as well as melatonin, a hormone that aids in regulation of the body’s internal clock.


Canola Oil


Canola oil is extracted from the seed of canola plant which is from the family of Brassica (Cabbage, Broccoli, and Cauliflower). It is rich in monounsaturated fat with a medium high smoke point of 425 degrees F, use it in baking sautéing, stir-fry, and in salad dressings. Some of the characteristic of canola oil are pale golden colour, light texture, neutral taste and high heat tolerance. The name “Canola” is a contraction of “Canadian” and “ola”, which means oil. There is a strict internationally regulated definition of canola that differentiates it from rapeseed, based upon it having less than two percent erucic acid and less than 30 micromoles of glucosinolates. Oil seed products that do not meet this standard cannot use the term canola. 

Almond Oil

It is extracted from the nut obtain from the inner shell of drupe fruit. Oil with monounsaturated fat and high smoke point of 495 degrees F, this is good oil for high heat cooking, like sautéing or frying. It’s great flavour also works well in deserts; it is also used for massage therapy.


Avocado Oil


It is extracted by cold pressing the avocado fruit; it is high in monounsaturated fat and vitamin E, has a high smoke point of 510 degrees F, this is a good oil for high heat cooking, like sautéing or frying, and tasty in salads such.

Grape Seed Oil


A polyunsaturated fat with a low saturated fat level, lots of vitamin E, no cholesterol, non –hydrogenated, omega-6s also this oil has a high smoke point of 420 degrees F, making it great for cooking and grilling of all kinds. It also has a very mild, nutty flavour that’s versatile enough to use in salads or virtually anything, good for heart as well.

 

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